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June 6, 2021

Where does the lit review go in a research paper?

Where does the lit review go in a research paper?

Every research report/ thesis/research article begins with an introduction to the topic of research. This forms the literature review for the article. The main purpose of the review is to introduce the readers to the need for conducting the said research.

How do you introduce a quotation?

Write a sentence in which you make the point you want to support or illustrate with the quotation. End the sentence with a colon to introduce your sentence. According to can be followed by the name of a publication or a person. Put a comma after the name of the person or publication that introduces the quote.

How do you cite a critical essay?

To cite a critical essay published in the same volume as a literary work, follow the MLA format template. List the author of the essay, followed by the title. Then list the name of the volume from which you accessed the essay, followed by the the volume’s publication details.

How do you introduce a paraphrase?

It is best to introduce the quotation or paraphrase with a signal phrase which includes the author’s name and provides context for the reader. That is, you must give the reader enough information to understand who is being quoted or paraphrased and why.

What are the 4 R’s of paraphrasing?

Key Resource: The 4 R’s–A Paraphrasing Strategy Review the graphic below that explains the 4 R’s: Read, Restate, Recheck, and Repair and use the attached graphic organizer to help you practice paraphrasing by using this strategy.

Do I need to quote a paraphrase?

Enclosing the words in quotation marks signals that the words are quoted. When you use your own words to convey information from an original source, you are paraphrasing. While paraphrases do not require quotation marks, they do require citations.

How do you introduce a text evidence?

1. You may incorporate textual evidence right into the sentence with the use of quotation marks, but your quote from the text must make sense in the context of the sentence. For example: April is so wildly confused that she actually “…hated Caroline because it was all her fault” (page 118).